SPIN PREMIERES THE WEATHER STATION’s NEW VIDEO FOR “KEPT IT ALL TO MYSELF”

The Weather Station Photo Credit: Shervin Lainez

The Weather Station Photo Credit: Shervin Lainez

 

SPIN premiered “Kept It All To Myself” – Watch NOW 

The Weather Station, Toronto’s Tamara Lindeman, will release her self-titled and fourth album on October 6th via Outside Music. After presenting lead single, “Thirty,” described by The FADER as “arresting folk-country,” the artist now shares “Kept It All to Myself” and its accompanying video, produced and directed by Maya Bankovic. “When I wrote the line ‘I Kept It All to Myself,’ I knew immediately I wanted it to be my entry to the canon of singalong,” says Lindeman. “It made me laugh, the idea of hearing ‘I Kept It All to Myself’ through loudspeakers, in clubs, through crowds. To sing out loud about privacy. But it’s true, too. I do keep most things to myself, for better or for worse. The song was my tribute to the unkempt acres of the unspoken-everything too crazy, beautiful, or strange to mention.”

 “An inspired continuation of a rich tradition of intensely-disciplined, self-interrogative pop songwriting. The taut arrangements on The Weather Station, adorned here with aerial surges of strings, create The Weather Station’s own specific music universe, at turns claustrophobic or extending all the way towards a distant horizon.”

- Winston Cook-Wilson, SPIN

 With The Weather Station, Lindeman reinvents her song craft with a vital new energy, framing her prose-poem narratives in bolder musical settings. It’s an emotionally candid statement – a work of urgency, generosity and joy – that feels like a collection of obliquely gut-punching short stories.  

 The album declares its understated feminist politics and new sonic directions from its first moments. There are big, buzzing guitars, thrusting drums, horror-movie strings, and her keening, Appalachian-tinged vocal melodies. Reaching towards a sort of accelerated talking blues, Lindeman sings with a new rapid-fire vocal style. “I wanted to make a rock and roll record,” she explains, “but one that sounded how I wanted it to sound, which of course is nothing like rock and roll.”